2013 Technical Symposium Technical Session Descriptions

 

2013 Technical Symposium Session Descriptions

TRACKS

PLUMBING SYSTEM DESIGN 101

Sanitary Waste & Vent/Storm Drainage
Stephen Howe, PE

Friday, September 20, 2013, 9 a.m. – noon

Strengthen your knowledge in the design and operation of sanitary and stormwater drainage systems during this comprehensive overview.  The session will cover how the sanitary and stormwater system codes began and where they stand now, hydraulics, open channel flow, and material specifications. It will include information on Hunter’s probability curves and drainage fixture units, along with sanitary pipe sizing using the code tables. Lastly, the session will cover stormwater rainfall rates and stormwater pipe sizing as given in the code tables.

Stephen Howe, PE, attended Northeastern University in Boston and received a degree in Civil Engineering. He is a registered New York State Professional Engineer and a New York State Code Enforcement Officer and also has PE licenses in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina. Stephen has 40 years of experience in the plumbing and fire protection fields and currently works at the New York State Department of Education as a Code Enforcement Officer.  In the position of Associate Mechanical Construction Engineer, he has reviewed school construction documents and provided technical assistance to design professionals.


Water Heater Sizing 


J. Joe Scott II, CPD, LEED AP, FASPE


Friday, September 20, 2:30 – 5:30 p.m.

This session will explore the sizing of water heaters and storage tanks and will present a methodology to assist designers in selecting the proper size of water heater for specific applications and building types. It will also explore the various factors impacting the selection, such as hot water temperature, demand versus storage, and demand versus flow rate. Various types of water heating systems, including tepid water systems and mixing valves, will also be discussed.

J. Joe Scott II, CPD, LEED AP, FASPE, is a Vice President and Senior Plumbing Designer for Cannon Design in its St. Louis, Missouri office. He has been involved in the design and specification of plumbing systems for the past 32 years, with an emphasis on healthcare, criminal justice, and laboratory building types. Joe has served on numerous ASPE committees and was the Task Force Chair for the design portion of the Domestic Water Heating Design Manual. He is a past ASPE President and served as the Editor of ASPE’s Plumbing Systems & Design magazine.


Natural Gas Piping Design


John Royds, PE


Saturday, September 21, 2013, 9 a.m. – noon

This seminar will discuss the basics of natural gas design, sizing, and calculations. The program will provide an overview of the required codes, system components, and piping materials used in natural gas applications. Attendees will understand more about commercial applications including combustion requirements, gas distribution pressures, and what to consider when designing these projects. The session will present pipe sizing examples using three pipe sizing methods and will include a detailed example of a natural gas system layout and sizing in a commercial building. The seminar will conclude with a discussion regarding lessons learned about natural gas piping systems.

John Royds, PE, has been with Johnson, Spellman, and Associates in Norcross, Georgia since 1987. He holds an Associate position and serves as the firm’s Senior Plumbing Design Engineer, responsible for plumbing system layouts and the design of domestic water, sanitary, rainwater, fuel gas, and specialty gas systems. John is also responsible for project coordination, project layout, field reviews, submittal reviews, code compliance, specifications, and value engineering. He has designed plumbing systems for new construction and renovations for a wide variety of projects including K12 schools, dining facilities, office buildings, aquatic centers, churches, libraries, laboratories, healthcare facilities, dormitories, athletic facilities, and communications facilities. John has actively participated in ASPE’s Atlanta Chapter as an elected officer since 2008 and served as the Chapter President for the 20102011 and 20112012 terms.


Emergency Plumbing Fixtures


Casey Hayes


Saturday, September 21, 2013, 2:15 – 5:15 p.m.

When working on a safety shower system, many designers do not truly understand the ANSI Z358.1 standard and the proper method to supply tempered water to the safety shower and eyewash equipment. The safety shower is the first line of defense after a chemical splash to the body takes place, and the proper selection of the safety shower and eyewash equipment is essential to wash the chemicals off the victim. Assumptions are often made when picking the shower and eyewash equipment that can impact the proper use of the shower and eyewash. In this session, attendees will gain a better understanding of ANSI Z358.1 as it relates to the types, uses, and locations of safety shower and eyewash equipment. Additionally, attendees will learn about the many ways and methods to provide tempered water to the equipment.

Casey Hayes is the Director of Haws Integrated with Haws Corporation in Sparks, Nevada. He has been with Haws for more than 25 years and is responsible for the management, strategy, and execution of the global Haws Integrated brand. In addition, Casey was part of the working group that developed the revised ANSI/ISEA Z358.1-2009: Emergency Eyewash and Shower Equipment standard and is a past board member for Plumbing Manufacturers International (PMI). With a degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Nevada, he values having the flexibility to offer Haws’ customers multiple solutions to their unique safety situations.


Needs Analysis for High-Purity Water System Design


Mike Schaefer, PE, CWS-VI


Sunday, September 22, 2013, 9 a.m. – noon

High-purity water is becoming more commonplace in many medical, industrial, pharmaceutical, and electronics production facilities. Whether high-purity water is used in a medical laboratory for glassware rinsing and blood analysis, in kidney hemodialysis, or as a final rinse of solvents from a metal anodizing process, the quality of the water that the end product sees is directly related to the final quality and durability of that product. This session will examine the different aspects of sizing and designing high-purity water systems, including conducting a needs analysis, sizing techniques and procedures, materials of construction, and understanding filtration techniques for problem water chemistry.

Mike Schaefer, PE, CWS-VI, works for Culligan Water Conditioning of Minnetonka, Minnesota, as Area Manager for the company’s six dealerships in Southeast Missouri and Southern Illinois.  He received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Missouri School of Science and Technology in 1982, is a registered Professional Engineer, and has worked in and around the water treatment industry for more than 25 years.


SUSTAINABLE DESIGN

Graywater Recovery & Reuse


Peter Cartwright, PE


Friday, September 20, 2013, 9 a.m. – noon

As a consequence of the increasing importance of water conservation and reuse, graywater recovery and reclamation of domestic, institutional, and commercial wastewater is becoming significantly more critical. The outcomes of this activity will help mitigate water shortage issues and reduce the volume of wastewater to publicly owned treatment works (POTW) facilities or septic systems. This first part of this session will underscore water shortage issues and describe current opportunities provided by rainwater harvesting and stormwater recovery. The wastewater quality characteristics from domestic water usage will be detailed as a function of fixture specifics, as well as daily quantity data. The second part of the session will identify the appropriate treatment technologies for each reuse activity and address current and future reuse opportunities as a function of regulatory limitations.

Peter Cartwright, PE, entered the water purification and wastewater treatment industry in 1974 and has had his own consulting engineering firm since 1980. He has a degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Minnesota and is a registered Professional Engineer in that state. Peter has provided consulting services to more than 250 clients globally, authored approximately 200 articles, written several book chapters, and presented more than 200 lectures at conferences around the world, and he is the recipient of several patents. He also provides extensive expert witness testimony and technology training courses. Peter is a founding member of the Technical Review Committee for Water Conditioning & Purification, on the Editorial Advisory Committee for Industrial WaterWorld, the Reader Advisory Board for Processing Magazine, and the Editorial Advisory Board of Filtration News. A peer reviewer for the Journal of Membrane Science, he is also on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin-Madison College of Engineering annual course “Process Piping Systems Design and Operation.” 

LEED Building Calculations


Sarah Balz, PE, CPD, LEED AP


Friday, September 20, 2:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Everyone from beginners new to LEED to seasoned professionals will be able to benefit from this session. It will focus on the areas in LEED for New Construction that impact plumbing design and construction, such as how to calculate water efficiency (WE) and other related credits, tips on filling out the LEED online templates, examples of required supplemental documentation, and things to consider when designing for LEED. In addition to focusing on LEED for New Construction, the session will also touch on credit differences in LEED for Healthcare and LEED for Commercial Interiors. By attending this session, participants will gain an overall understanding of the plumbing-related calculations required for LEED certification.

Sarah Balz, PE, CPD, LEED AP, is a Piping/Plumbing Engineer with Affiliated Engineers Inc., a global engineering consulting firm, where she has been since earning a bachelor’s degree in Architectural Engineering from the Milwaukee School of Engineering in 1996. She is responsible for the design of large-scale, technically complex building projects for government, higher education, and pharmaceutical/biotech clients. A member of AEI’s Water Stewardship team, Sarah is in a constant forward motion, researching and proposing new and unique solutions to energy and water conservation for her clients’ projects. She has contributed to a number of LEED projects, including the King Abdullah University of Science and Technologythe world’s largest collection of LEED Platinum buildingsthe LEED Platinum Advanced Energy Research and Technology Center at Stony Brook University in New York, the LEED Gold Silverman Hall for Molecular Therapeutics and Diagnostics at Northwestern University, and the LEED Gold Biorenewables Complex at Iowa State University. Sarah is an active member of ASPE, holding office leadership positions including her past chapter presidency role, and contributing to the ASPE Plumbing Engineering Design Handbook.


Rainwater Harvesting 


Mark Girgenti


Saturday, September 21, 2013, 9 a.m. – noon

With the increasing development of green technologies, water recycling is now at the forefront of building design. This session will examine all aspects of rainwater and stormwater harvesting systems, focusing on rainwater quality and different state and national guidelines for rainwater treatment. System sizing will be covered, including the impact of different architectural geometries as well as regional variations in precipitation, which will be compared to water usage to determine storage volumes and flow rates for systems to meet end-user requirements. The anatomy of the treatment process required for proper water reuse also will be explored, focusing on different treatment strategies based on water quality and the water source in addition to some of the pitfalls in treatment processes. Understanding what factors can impact reclaimed water quality and how it is determined will also be reviewed.  Case studies of existing systems will be presented, as well as sample scenarios for building a system from the ground up. 

Mark Girgenti is the Lead Sales and Design Engineer for Burt Process Equipment, an environmental process equipment firm. He has spearheaded the design, integration, project management, and construction of water treatment equipment for wastewater, rainwater harvesting, graywater, and high-purity water systems in the government, institutional, and pharmaceutical industries. Mark has presented technical sessions at numerous venues, including the Boston Green Table Discussion, ASPE Chicago and Houston Chapter symposiums, the 2011 ASPE Technical Symposium and 2012 ASPE Convention & Exposition, and the 2013 ASPE Webinar Series. He holds a bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and a Master of Science in Chemistry. Mark is actively involved in academic circles as a professional member of the Graduate Advisory Committee for Southern Connecticut State University and also serves as a volunteer faculty member. 


Integrating Solar & Hydronic Heating in Buildings


Dr. Fredric Milder & Bristol Stickney


Saturday, September 21, 2013, 2:15 – 5:15 p.m.

Solar heating can be integrated most easily with hydronic heating and domestic water heating systems because solar thermal panels provide hot fluid at temperatures that are compatible with normal heat loads. However, to make the best use of the solar heat when it is available and to minimize parasitic heat loss and pump (electric) power, the heating system design must treat all heat sources, loads, and storage components as an integrated system. This session will introduce and discuss best practices for a simple, optimally efficient system design for hydronic heating and domestic water heating applications that is modular, easily adaptable, and scalable.

Dr. Fredric Milder is a founder and CEO of SolarLogic LLC and has taken the company and its products from concepts on paper, through development, to manufacturing and sales. The company has garnered five U.S. patents protecting the company’s transformative approach to solar heating and hot water production. Prior to SolarLogic, Fred founded and led two startup companies in the medical device industry: Implemed Inc. from its inception in 1991 through 2000 and, as a spinoff from Implemed, CryoCath Technologies Inc. in 1995, which went public in 2000 and was eventually bought by Medtronic Inc. in a friendly takeover in 2008. After serving as CryoCath’s CEO, he served on the Board of Directors and was a consultant to the company in the areas of science, technology, and intellectual property from startup through the buyout.  Fred holds a B.A. in Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Nuclear Physics from the University of Michigan.

Bristol Stickney is a Partner and Chief Technical Officer with SolarLogic LLC in Santa Fe, New Mexico where he is involved in the development of solar heating control systems and design tools for solar heating professionals. He received a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Maine at Orono and has been designing, manufacturing, repairing, and installing solar hydronic heating systems for more than 30 years. Bristol is the author of numerous articles on solar heating applications published in a variety of heating-related magazines including ASPE’s official publication, Plumbing Engineer, SolarPro, Plumbing Heating Contractor, HomePower, and the ASHRAE Journal. He worked with the New Mexico Solar Energy Association for 15 years as Staff Engineer, Director of Research, Associate Director, Treasurer, and Vice Chairman of the Board. Bristol works with architects, engineers, building designers, contractors, and homeowners to provide efficient and reliable solar heating systems. He has been awarded five patents related to the design and control of solar hydronic heating systems.


Green Codes Panel Discussion


Shawn Martin, Brendan Owens, PE, LEED Fellow, Thomas Pape, Dave Viola,


Sunday, September 22, 2013, 9 a.m. – noon

During this panel discussion, representatives from ASHRAE, the International Code Council, International Association of Plumbing & Mechanical Officials, and U.S. Green Building Council will talk about their organizations’ current initiatives related to green codes and standards. The presenters will provide an overview of their organizations, their code and standards development processes, their green model codes and standards, and the codes’ and standards’ impact on plumbing system design. Following the presentations, Jim Kendzel, ASPE Executive Director/CEO, will facilitate a Q&A period with a focus on the future of green codes and standards and their impact on plumbing systems.

Shawn Martin is Director of the Plumbing, Mechanical, and Fuel Gas (PMG) Program for the International Code Council. He has experience managing product development, building technology research, and testing programs, particularly in the fields of fluid dynamics and residential building technologies. He has participated in numerous green code and standards efforts, including WaterSense product specifications, ASHRAE 191, ICC-700: National Green Building Standard, the International Green Construction Code, and all three model plumbing codes. He also serves on the USGBC LEED Water-Efficiency Technical Advisory Group. Shawn previously conducted research into advanced and green building technologies with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s PATH program and the Department of Energy’s Building American program. Shawn previously was the Technical Director for Plumbing Manufacturers International, and prior to that he managed the applied field research of the NAHB Research Center as the Director of the Technology Division. Shawn holds a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Grove City College and an M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Vanderbilt University. He holds several patents for fluid-flow products.

Brendan Owens is USGBC’s Vice President of LEEDtechnical development, where he collaborates with volunteer technical committees to evolve and refine USGBC’s LEED Green Building Rating System. During his time at USGBC, Brendan has led development activities for several LEED rating systems. He represents USGBC on the Executive Committee for ASHRAE/IES/USGBC Standard 189.1, is the liaison to the International Code Council for the International Green Construction Code, and is a member of the Board of Directors for the New Buildings Institute. Prior to joining USGBC, Brendan worked designing, implementing, and verifying performance contract-based energy conservation projects in existing buildings. Brendan was honored as a LEED Fellow in 2012 and is a licensed Professional Engineer.

Thomas Pape has more than 25 years of experience in planning, designing, and implementing water- and energy-efficiency strategies. He has designed, managed, and/or implemented projects for more than 200 water agencies in the United States and abroad. After earning a degree in Comprehensive Planning and Design from Southern Illinois UniversityCarbondale, Thomas garnered experience in both the public and private sectors, and he currently operates an independent consulting practice and serves as a Technical Consultant for the Alliance for Water Efficiency. Thomas also currently serves as a Principal on the IAPMO Green Technical Committee and the IAPMO Technical Committee, a Leader of Work Group 6 for ASHRAE 189.1, and a Principal on the Sustainability Committee for the ICC International Green Construction Code.

 

HEALTHCARE DESIGN

Intermediate Medical Gas Design
Jeff White


Friday, September 20, 2013, 9 a.m. – noon

This session will review design considerations for the design, sizing, and specification of medical gas systems and will explain how to apply Chapter 5 of NFPA 99: Health Care Facilities Code. This is a hands-on class, and participants will be working with a sample facility. Attendees are asked to bring a calculator.

Jeff White attended The Ohio State University and began his career in business working with a local Cincinnati retailer, starting their commercial sales business and later managing their retail division. He has worked in the medical gas industry for almost 20 years, starting with his father’s manufacturers’ representative firm in 1995 where he was Vice President of Sales, working with Puritan Bennett and many other product lines in the medical gas field. He started working directly for Beacon Medical in 2001 and is currently the BeaconMedaes Territory Sales Manager for the Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, and Tennessee areas.


Advanced Medical Gas Design


Jeff White


Friday, September 20, 2:30 – 5:30 p.m.

This session will look at advanced topics in the design of medical gases, including some emerging technologies and how they can be dealt with in the design process. It also will discuss the common ground between laboratory and medical gas systems.

Jeff White attended The Ohio State University and began his career in business working with a local Cincinnati retailer, starting their commercial sales business and later managing their retail division. He has worked in the medical gas industry for almost 20 years, starting with his father’s manufacturers’ representative firm in 1995 where he was Vice President of Sales, working with Puritan Bennett and many other product lines in the medical gas field. He started working directly for Beacon Medical in 2001 and is currently the BeaconMedaes Territory Sales Manager for the Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, and Tennessee areas.


Fuel Oil Handling Systems


Lee Carnahan


Saturday, September 21, 2013, 9 a.m. – noon

This session will provide an overview of fuel oil handling systems (FOHS) from concept to completed design, starting with questions to ask at project inception and running simple but crucial calculations to achieve an initial conceptual design. Then design layout, estimates, calculations to ensure proper fuel load, and several items that are often overlooked will be discussed, followed by major component selection and how those selections affect subsystem design and functionality, as well as detail components. All aspects of the FOHS design process will be covered, including storage tank types, pumps, piping, valves, spill containment, leak detection, climate-specific items, and controls. How supply and return piping layouts affect proper pipe and pump sizing throughout the system will be explained, as well as specification writing, potential pitfalls, special design considerations, and alternative fuels. Real-world examples and experiences will be discussed.

Lee Carnahan is Product Manager, Fuel Oil Handling at Preferred Utilities Manufacturing Corporation, responsible for assisting and supporting engineers in the design of fuel oil handling systems for generator and boiler installations. His support often begins with conceptual design and continues through the design and construction process to system commissioning, as well as design/build, tenant improvements, and repair/replacement projects and contractors. Lee holds a B.A. from the University of California, Santa Cruz and has been working exclusively with FOHS systems since 2006 as a Sales Engineer, Project Manager, and Product Manager. He has worked on many major hospital and data center design and construction projects and also has experience in piping systems. Lee holds certifications including OSHA-30 and Excavation Safety. 


Guidelines & Designs for Healthcare Facilities


Joseph Messina, CPD, and Stephen Panzarino, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP


Saturday, September 21, 2013, 2:15 – 5:15 p.m.

Guidelines for Design and Construction of Health Care Facilities was taken from the original General Standards appearing in the Federal Register on February 14, 1947 and was developed from a multidiscipline committee and subcommittees consisting of architects and engineers. Thus, this session will present the perspective of a plumbing designer as well as an architect. Attendees will learn how this document came about, what agencies where involved in writing it, and changes from the 2006 edition to the 2010 edition in the “Planning, Design, Construction, and Commissioning” chapter and the “Site, Equipment, Common Elements for Hospitals” chapter, which will be architectural changes that will affect the plumbing design. During the second half of the session, attendees will get into small groups for a workshop with prepared exercises and discussions. After leaving this seminar, attendees will have a complete understanding of this guideline and its purpose.

Joseph V. Messina, CPD, is a Professional Associate and Plumbing Section Manager for HDR Architecture Inc. in Atlanta. He has more than 40 years of engineering and design experience in plumbing systems and has extensive experience with healthcare, laboratory, and vivarium facilities. Joe is a graduate of Lamar University in Beaumont, Texas and has been a member of ASPE since 1988. He served on the Greenville Chapter board of directors for several years while living in South Carolina, as well as the Atlanta Chapter board, where he now serves as President. Joe also sits on the ASPE Education Committee, where he has been involved in publishing PowerPoints and assisting with the selection of seminars for the ASPE Technical Symposiums and ASPE Convention & Exposition. He was the author of the “Designer’s Notebook” column in Plumbing Systems & Design magazine.

Stephen Panzarino, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP, is Managing Principal for HDR Architecture in Tampa, Florida, with overall responsibility for projects in the local office, and has more than 29 years of design and master planning experience. He has been involved with numerous high-profile and complex projects, ranging from large mixed-use developments to multi-phased developments. Stephen has worked on projects in several countries around the world and in a variety of team relationships, working closely with clients and his design team to develop consensus-based solutions for very complex programs. Stephen holds a B.Arch from the New Jersey School of Architecture and is a member of the Urban Land Institute, Bio-Florida, U.S. Green Building Council, and Tampa Bay Partnership.


Sanitary Hospitals


James Dipping, PE, CPD, LEED AP


Sunday, September 22, 2013, 9 a.m. – noon

This session will discuss the many impacts that the plumbing discipline has on keeping a hospital sanitary. From the interface that patients, doctors, and staff have with plumbing fixtures to the many piping systems behind the wall, plumbing plays a very important role in reducing the possibility of infection. Special considerations in the design process that must be made when designing plumbing systems in a hospital to minimize maintenance, repair, and hospital shut-down will be covered, as well as the many specialized systems—including dialysis, clean steam and reverse osmosis, testing and pathology labs, and medical equipment—in which plumbing plays a vital role to maintaining hospital operations.

James Dipping, PE, CPD, LEED AP, is the Plumbing Engineering Discipline Leader and Technical Authority for Plumbing Engineering serving the healthcare and mission-critical market sectors at Environmental Systems Design Inc. in Chicago. He went to the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he majored in mechanical engineering and has been a registered Professional Engineer in Illinois since June 2007.

 

ADVANCED PLUMBING DESIGN


High-Rise Design: Hot Water Recirculation & General Pumping Practices


Chris Edmondson


Friday, September 20, 2013, 9 a.m. – noon

In this seminar, attendees will learn from a plumbing historical review the different methods used to supply buildings with domestic water, how to use and utilize a domestic water pressure booster selection procedure to calculate the required flow and pressures for high-rise applications, and how to properly size and locate a hydropneumatic tank. The advantages of variable-speed versus constant-speed pressure boosting will be compared to help attendees understand the new pressure booster requirement in ASHRAE 90.1–2010. In addition, the session will take a detailed look at the application of domestic hot water recirculation on high-rise design, reviewing the importance of conserving water and how to calculate the required recirculation flow rates. Three potential recirculation trouble areas—instantaneous water heaters, balance, and high-rise buildings with pressure-reducing valves—will be explored.

Chris Edmondson is the CEO of James M. Pleasants Company, and he received his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from North Carolina State University in 1967. He is a Distinguished Lecturer for ASHRAE and has given talks to various ASHRAE chapters and CRC meetings. His principal areas of interest are energy savings, primary/secondary variable-volume systems, heat transfer, hydronic systems, plumbing piping systems, and central chilled water plant design.

 

The Business Case for Wastewater Recycling


Mark Meredith


Friday, September 20, 2:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Many project teams do not consider integrating graywater or blackwater recycling into their projects because they presume it’s not cost-effective or feel it’s too risky. Not too long ago, these assumptions would have been well founded, but with advancements in risk management and technology and numerous macroeconomic factors, in-building wastewater recycling is more practical and cost-effective than ever before. It’s up to plumbing engineers to educate project teams on the potential for wastewater recycling. In this session, case studies will be examined to illustrate the necessary steps to assess the economic viability of wastewater recycling, providing a comprehensive understanding of how to build a business case for graywater and blackwater recycling.

Mark Meredith is a Product Manager at PHOENIX Process Equipment Company, where he leads the water-recycling team, which features Aquacell water-recycling solutions. Aquacell is an Australian technology for on-site graywater and blackwater reuse, and PHOENIX is the exclusive distributor of Aquacell in North America. Since 2010, Mark has directed U.S. sales, marketing, project management, and regulatory matters for Aquacell’s turnkey graywater and blackwater solutions. He is passionate about the advancement of on-site wastewater reuse in the U.S. and frequently contributes to this cause by conducting educational seminars, speaking at conferences and events, and advocating the adoption of new and improved policies to support the practice. Prior to taking on Aquacell, Mark held several positions in the federal government, including the U.S. Senate and most recently as a Policy Advisor at the U.S. Department of Commerce, where he helped develop national economic development policy. Mark has also worked as a consultant to startups and SBEs on marketing, finance, and growth strategies. 

Commissioning of Plumbing Systems


Matthew Nelson, PE, CPMP


Saturday, September 21, 2013, 9 a.m. – noon

Building commissioning has long been a part of the LEED rating system, but few design professionals understand it well or know what to expect, other than it is supposed to make a building “work” better. However, the benefits that commissioning creates are numerous. This session will first take a general look at building commissioning to understand its purpose, how to become a commissioning authority, and some of the ways commissioning can be priced as a service. The focus will then narrow to explore plumbing commissioning specifically and the scope of possible systems. In addition, the different stages of the process and how engineers can get more out of the building commissioning process will be reviewed. The session will conclude with a series of lessons learned from past projects. By the end, attendees should have a great handle on plumbing commissioning as well as take away actionable information to help improve their daily engineering practices.

Matthew Nelson, PE, CPMP, Founder and Managing Principal of ECO Commissions, is a Professional Engineer who has worked in the commissioning, energy services, design/build, and consulting engineering fields since 1996. His project engineering and commissioning experience includes various building types including healthcare, institutional, commercial, and government. He has also been involved in the development of ASHRAE's commissioning (CPMP) and building energy assessor (BEAP) certification examinations with other internationally recognized commissioning and energy experts. Throughout his career Matthew has constantly sought to understand and improve the design, construction, and operation of the projects that he has worked on, advocating for his clients and ensuring that they receive a building that meets their operational requirements.


Siphonic Roof Drainage


Peter Kraut, PE


Saturday, September 21, 2013, 2:15 – 5:15 p.m.

During this session, a brief discussion on how a siphonic roof drain system operates will precede an in-depth look into when and where siphonic roof drainage is appropriate, including a step-by-step process for obtaining code approval of these systems. A classroom exercise will explore routing options, tributary areas, vertical surfaces, shading, ponding, sumps, gutters, and crickets. The exercise will include a step-by-step method for determining the approximate pipe size and reducer placements within the system. The reasoning and methods for balancing, which apply to any system, will be discussed in detail. Note: Procedures for balancing will not include the proprietary data-entry methods for the various manufacturers’ software. The seminar will conclude with an overview of dimensioning standards, construction documents, and construction administration requirements.

Peter Kraut, PE, is a Mechanical Engineer specializing in the design of plumbing systems. He studied Civil Engineering for two years at the University of Lowell in Massachusetts and then earned a Bachelor of Science in Architectural Engineering Technology from Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston. He began his work experience during college as a land surveyor, and after graduation he worked as a construction project manager. In these jobs, Peter gained experience in the installation of HVAC, plumbing, and fire protection systems, which would later prove to be invaluable in the design of these systems. He is an active member and Past President of ASPE’s Los Angeles Chapter.


Fire Sprinkler Shop Drawing & Hydraulic Calculations Review


Raymond Parham, PE


Sunday, September 22, 2013, 9 a.m. – noon

This session will cover the basics of reviewing sprinkler submittals from contractors, including how to properly review the design and layout of the sprinkler system and identify the proper locations of sprinklers and system components, review product data against NFPA 13 and the contract documents, and review the content of hydraulic calculations for compliance with NFPA standards. The session will also include a discussion of the responsibilities of the reviewing engineer/designer as they relate to contract documents as compared to reviews by the authority having jurisdiction.

Raymond Parham, PE, is employed by Page Southerland Page in Houston in the role of Lead Engineer in the Piping/Fire Protection Department. With more than 25 years of experience in mechanical design and building construction, he has a well-rounded knowledge of the challenges that multidiscipline integration poses in performing a complete building design. Ray graduated from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1982 with a bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering (Cooperative Plan). He has been a registered Professional Mechanical Engineer since 1986 and a registered Fire Protection Engineer since 1999. Ray is an active member of ASPE, NFPA, and the Society of Fire Protection Engineers. His design experience includes laboratory and medical specialty utilities such as compressed air, natural gas, nitrogen, helium, oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, hydrogen, argon systems, and vacuum systems; potable, nonpotable and deionized/reverse osmosis high-purity water systems; acid waste and acid dilution systems; and chemical, wet, and dry fire suppression systems.


BUILDING INFORMATION MODELING (BIM)

BIM Standards


Deke Smith, FAIA


Friday, September 20, 2013, 9 a.m. – noon

The facilities industry is undergoing profound change as building information modeling is being implemented. All aspects of the facility life-cycle are involved, and plumbing is no exception. Business processes are being re-engineered by subject matter experts, and the plumbing industry needs to be represented in the changes. To that end, ASPE signed a memorandum of agreement with the National Institute of Building Sciences’ buildingSMART alliance to represent its members and identify standards that are specific to plumbing engineers. This session will describe BIM, its benefits, and the work that must be accomplished to realize those benefits. This is a fast moving train important to the future of plumbing engineers.

Deke Smith, FAIA, is the Executive Director for the buildingSMART alliance at the National Institute of Building Sciences (NIBS). He was instrumental in the beginnings of the NIBS Construction Criteria Base, now the Whole Building Design Guide, and he initiated both the National CAD Standard and the National BIM Standard. Deke retired in December 2006 after 30 years as a Designer and Director with the Naval Facilities Engineering Command, Deputy CIO at the Army Research Laboratory, and Chief Architect for the Deputy Under-Secretary of Defense for Installations and Environment in supporting the DoD’s 540,000 facilities. After 22 years as a volunteer, he joined NIBS as an employee in early 2007. Deke won the 1996 Federal 100 award, 1997 NIBS Member Award, and 2006 CAD Society Leadership Award, and in 2010 he was selected as one of the InfoComm 100. Deke is a graduate of Virginia Tech and holds a B.Arch., and he did post-graduate work at the National Defense University. He is a registered architect in the state of Virginia and a Fellow in the American Institute of Architects. Deke co-authored Building Information Modeling: A Strategic Implementation Guide, published in 2009 by Wiley.


Beginning BIM Class


Samuel Leo


Friday, September 20, 2:30 – 5:30 p.m.

Building information modeling is the concept of managing all of a building’s design, coordination, and collaboration in one database/dataset. This session is suited for users and non-users of the technology who may have little or no experience working on a BIM project. The first half of the session will define the BIM process, delineating some of the key aspects that could ultimately affect the end-users’ production efforts and jeopardize the success of a project. It will explore a BIM execution plan, levels of development (LOD), and the importance of having a structured BIM team. During the second half, Revit 2014, one of many BIM technologies in the market, will be explored hands-on, starting with a brief history of the technology and then describing the user interface and the Revit workflow that keeps content-systems-schedules all connected. By the end of the session, participants will have a better understanding of the differences between BIM the process and BIM the technology (Revit) and not use the terms interchangeably. Attendees also will have a basic understanding of how to use Revit and how it differentiates from its younger sibling AutoCAD.

Note: This session requires preregistration. If you did not register for the session with your Symposium registration, see the Registration Desk to sign up. Participants must bring their own laptop. A free trial of Revit will be supplied to download.

Samuel Leo has been working in the AEC design field since 1991 and has been an ASPE member since 1997. He began his career as an Architectural, MEP, and Structural AutoCAD Drafter for Beato & Associates, a consulting engineering firm in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, where he was also first exposed to 3D modeling. In 1995 he moved to Orlando, Florida, where his career path took him into the plumbing and fire protection systems design arena. Samuel has always itched to find ways to help his peers increase their CAD productivity and efficiency through software technology implementation, customization, and the development of processes and workflows. He was the CAD/BIM Manager for two major plumbing contractors in Central Florida, gaining experience in producing 3D pipework fabrication shop drawings and building system installation sequencing as well as his first exposure to Revit MEP. As a member of ASPE’s Central Florida Chapter, he has served as a board member since 1998 and as President in 20052006. Samuel joined TLC Engineering for Architecture as a Plumbing and Fire Protection Designer in 2010, where he gained full-time exposure to Revit’s platform. He spearheaded the quick development of Revit workflows that catapulted the company’s Plumbing and Fire Protection Revit implementation ahead of schedule and currently serves as head of the TLC Revit Implementation Taskforce. Sam is a Revit 2012 and 2013 Certified Professional and a member of the Orlando Revit User Group.


BIM: Building Revit Families


Brandon Henson, PE


Saturday, September 21, 2013, 9 a.m. – noon

This session will discuss what Revit families are and how they are used, including how simple two-dimensional families can be made and used for symbols when a company’s standards and the out-of-the-box Revit symbols don’t match. A demonstration on how these families can be made and items such as connectors can be included so the family will be connected to the system within the model will be provided. Finally, parameters that can be added to the families to add intelligence, such as specification information and dimension control, will be explained, and attendees will receive a step-by-step instruction on how to build a simple family with parameters.

Brandon Henson, PE, is an Engineer for Harrell Saltrick & Hopper, a Charlotte, North Carolina-based architectural and engineering firm that focuses on healthcare projects for the Veterans Administration medical centers. His responsibilities include working directly with the VA to produce plumbing and fire protection drawings for various construction projects, including patient care facilities and support facilities such as boiler plants. His technical knowledge includes a variety of systems, including industrial water treatment, fire protection, solar water heating, and conventional plumbing systems. Brandon is a licensed Professional Engineer in North Carolina and is active in the local ASPE Charlotte Chapter.


Advanced BIM Class #1 


Samuel Leo


Saturday, September 21, 2013, 2:15 – 5:15 p.m.

This class is suited for Revit users who have invested some time inside the technology and are looking to expand their skillset. It will use Revit 2014 and AutoCAD in a hands-on setting to explore topics such as how to set a Revit project as a combined or separate discipline project, model management techniques, the Revit MEP workflow that keeps all data interconnected, how to annotate the model with keynotes and tags, and how to convert AutoCAD details to Revit. By the end of the class, participants will be able to make recommendations to project teams on which project setup approach to use, implement preventive modeling measures to maintain the good overall health of the Revit model, expand their knowledge based on the do’s and don’ts of Revit workflows, implement automatic keynoting tools, and convert plumbing and fire protection details from AutoCAD to Revit without losing any lines.

This BIM session requires pre-registration. If you did not register for the session with your Symposium registration, see the Registration Desk to sign up. Participants must bring their own laptop. A free trial of Revit will be supplied to download.

Samuel Leo has been working in the AEC design field since 1991 and has been an ASPE member since 1997. He began his career as an Architectural, MEP, and Structural AutoCAD Drafter for Beato & Associates, a consulting engineering firm in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, where he was also first exposed to 3D modeling. In 1995 he moved to Orlando, Florida, where his career path took him into the plumbing and fire protection systems design arena. Samuel has always itched to find ways to help his peers increase their CAD productivity and efficiency through software technology implementation, customization, and the development of processes and workflows. He was the CAD/BIM Manager for two major plumbing contractors in Central Florida, gaining experience in producing 3D pipework fabrication shop drawings and building system installation sequencing as well as his first exposure to Revit MEP. As a member of ASPE’s Central Florida Chapter, he has served as a board member since 1998 and as President in 20052006. Samuel joined TLC Engineering for Architecture as a Plumbing and Fire Protection Designer in 2010, where he gained full-time exposure to Revit’s platform. He spearheaded the quick development of Revit workflows that catapulted the company’s Plumbing and Fire Protection Revit implementation ahead of schedule and currently serves as head of the TLC Revit Implementation Taskforce. Sam is a Revit 2012 and 2013 Certified Professional and a member of the Orlando Revit User Group.


Advanced BIM Class #2 


Samuel Leo


Sunday, September 22, 2013, 9 a.m. – noon

This class is suited for Revit users who have invested some time inside the technology and are looking to expand their skillset. It will use Revit 2014 and AutoCAD in a hands-on setting to explore topics such as how to set a Revit project as a combined or separate discipline project, model management techniques, the Revit MEP workflow that keeps all data interconnected, how to annotate the model with keynotes and tags, and how to convert AutoCAD details to Revit. By the end of the class, participants will be able to make recommendations to project teams on which project setup approach to use, implement preventive modeling measures to maintain the good overall health of the Revit model, expand their knowledge based on the do’s and don’ts of Revit workflows, implement automatic keynoting tools, and convert plumbing and fire protection details from AutoCAD to Revit without losing any lines.

Note: This BIM session requires pre-registration. If you did not register for the session with your Symposium registration, see the Registration Desk to sign up. Participants must bring their own laptop. A free trial of Revit will be supplied to download.

Samuel Leo has been working in the AEC design field since 1991 and has been an ASPE member since 1997. He began his career as an Architectural, MEP, and Structural AutoCAD Drafter for Beato & Associates, a consulting engineering firm in the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, where he was also first exposed to 3D modeling. In 1995 he moved to Orlando, Florida, where his career path took him into the plumbing and fire protection systems design arena. Samuel has always itched to find ways to help his peers increase their CAD productivity and efficiency through software technology implementation, customization, and the development of processes and workflows. He was the CAD/BIM Manager for two major plumbing contractors in Central Florida, gaining experience in producing 3D pipework fabrication shop drawings and building system installation sequencing as well as his first exposure to Revit MEP. As a member of ASPE’s Central Florida Chapter, he has served as a board member since 1998 and as President in 20052006. Samuel joined TLC Engineering for Architecture as a Plumbing and Fire Protection Designer in 2010, where he gained full-time exposure to Revit’s platform. He spearheaded the quick development of Revit workflows that catapulted the company’s Plumbing and Fire Protection Revit implementation ahead of schedule and currently serves as head of the TLC Revit Implementation Taskforce. Sam is a Revit 2012 and 2013 Certified Professional and a member of the Orlando Revit User Group.